Youth Summit Presenters - 2022

Michelle Nieviadomy

Michelle Nieviadomy

Michelle Nieviadomy is Nehiyaw Iskwew (Cree woman) with a passion for wellness, social justice & community development.  

She is a member of Kawacatoose First Nation and while her roots are in Saskatchewan, she has called Edmonton home for the past 20 years.

She is the Assistant Director at the Edmonton Native Healing Centre. 

She is an entrepreneur with her own business called Iskwew Health promoting health & wellness in various capacities! (Zumba, meditation, bootcamp, fitness kickboxing, wellness retreats)  She believes movement is medicine & connection is everything!  

 

 


Hal Eagletail

Hal EagletailHal Eagletail is one of the busiest and most respected Elders of the Northern Dene TsuuT’ina Nation, located in the Treaty 7 area of southern Alberta.

An entrepreneur: he is owner of Eaglestar Enterprises Ltd., a company that specializes in cultural consultancy and media relations. He has promoted Dance Troupes international, travelling to New Zealand, Switzerland, Germany, France, and England to help educate and share First Nations history and cultural identity.

In 2007 he was asked by the Alberta Government to represent First Nations of Alberta at the Smithsonian Folklife festival in Washington DC on Historical Evolution of Alberta’s Native Peoples.

He specializes in traditional medicines – using herbs and ceremony to restore health and balance. Hal is in constant demand to speak, advise or share his wealth of knowledge in Indigenous history, identity, and reconciliation.

Hal is the first person to remind you ‘humour is one of First Nations best healing medicines.’ Hal, for sure, has no shortage of that to prescribe.


  

– Day 1 -

Welcoming Remarks:

Stanley Barnaby, Cando President

Shawna Morning-Bull, Cando’s Alberta Board of Director

 

StanleyStanley Barnaby is a proud Mi’gmaq from the Listuguj First Nation and currently resides in Wolastoquey Territory where he works as the CEO for the Joint Economic Development Initiative. Prior to his role as CEO, Stanley was the Finance and Operations Manager for 3 years and the Senior Project Manager for 1 year.

Stanley attended the University of New Brunswick (UNB) in Fredericton for his bachelor’s in business administration. From there, he received his Technician in Aboriginal Economic Development (TAED) certification through Cando, and he also received his First Nation Business Administration certificate from UNB through the Mi’kmaq-Maliseet Institute (MMI). Throughout his time at JEDI, he has continued to grow his skills through completing the Management Development Program Certificate and Master’s Certificate in Project Management from the College of Extended Learning at UNB. Stanley recently received my Professional Aboriginal Economic Development (PAED) certification through CANDO in 2019.

Stanley has been involved with CANDO since 2015 when he was a part of the CANDO Economic Development Youth Summit Advisory Committee. The committee saw the Youth Summit come to life in 2018 and it has been a huge success since its launch. In 2018, Stanley was elected the New Brunswick & Prince Edward Island Representative for the CANDO Board where he played a key role in bringing CANDO’s National Conference to Fredericton, NB.

Stanley has a strong passion for Indigenous Economic Development and Workforce Development, and looks forward to his new role as CEO of JEDI and as newly elected President of the Cando Board.

 

ShawnaShawna Morning-Bull is a member of the Piikani First Nation located in Southern Alberta. Shawna is presently employed as the Manager Business Development at Community Futures Treaty Seven (CFT7) in Calgary, Alberta. In this capacity she is responsible for the overall direction, evaluation, and operations of the various development initiatives which the Community Futures Treaty Seven is currently involved in or wishes to pursue. Shawna has been employed by Community Futures Treaty Seven for the past 9 years. Prior, she was a Business Loans Manag-er with Alberta Indian Investment Corporation and a Business Support Officer with Indian Business Corporation, but her career in business began with Peace Hills Trust in 1997. She is a graduate of Lethbridge College with Busi-ness Management and Criminal Justice. Presently, she is the Secretary for Piikani Resource Development Limited Board of Directors, an entity operating on the Piikani Nation to develop, design and implement projects, pro-grams and services for the benefit of her First Nation economy. In 2015, Shawna joined the Calgary Chamber of Commerce Indigenous Opportunities Sub-Committee. Shawna, also is on the Board of Directors on her second term with CANDO as the Alberta Representative and is the 2018 recipient of the Chief David Crowchild Award, she was presented this award by Mayor Nenshi in June 2018 for her efforts to build bridges in and around Calgary between indigenous and non-indigenous people and entities.

Shawna is married to Wade and together they have 5 children and 2 grandchildren. She enjoys attending her chil-dren’s activities such as college basketball, hockey, mixed martial arts, wrestling and they all enjoy hitting the powwow trail, where Shawna is a traditional dancer.

Youth Empowerment/Lateral Violence:

Aubrey-Anne Laliberte-Pewapisconias, EDYS Planning Committee Member

Nathan Crow, Cando’s National Student Director

Aubrey AnneAubrey-Anne Laliberte-Pewapisconias is a nêhiyâskwew from Canoe Lake Cree Nation on Treaty 10 Territory, with paternal roots to Little Pine First Nation on Treaty 6 Territory. Aubrey is a recent graduate from the University of Saskatchewan with her Bachelor of Commerce with a major in Finance, a Global Business Stream Certificate, and an Indigenous Governance and Politics Certificate. During her time on campus, she worked to advance Indigenous student success by co-founding the Indigenous Business Students’ Society in October of 2018, a locally and nationally recognized group. She furthered this work through her role on the Edwards Business Students’ Society where she created and implemented the first Indigenous Initiatives Strategy for a business student group in Canada. 

Her work extends outside of her campus community through her time working for numerous Indigenous organizations such as Saskatchewan Indian Gaming Authority and Indigenous Clean Energy, and now, as an Operations Consultant with Tatâga Inc. Aubrey also speaks at events across the country on topics such as Indigenous Youth Empowerment and Economic Reconciliation from an Indigenous Youth Lens. Her passions have also led her to be in the first cohort of Generation Power, a National Ambassador of Hope for the We Matter Campaign, and as the National Student Director for Cando for which she recently completed two terms. With Cando, Aubrey has sat on multiple committees and was part of the 15th Annual National Youth Panel.

 

 

 

Nathan CrowNathan Crow is a proud Blackfoot male and a member of the Kainai First Nation, also known as the Blood Tribe. He grew up off-reserve his entire life and believes that this lived experience has enabled him to walk in two worlds and see the world through a two-eyed seeing lens. Crow returned to school as a mature student in September of 2019, after taking nine years off from his educational journey to enter the work force. Since returning to school, Crow has fully dedicated himself towards succeeding and reaching his full potential. Upon enrolling in the Indigenous Governance and Business Management program, he has made the Dean's Honor list in the Fall 2020 and Spring 2021 semesters, while also working two part time jobs with the University of Lethbridge: in the library as a student assistant, and with enrolment services as a student mentor. He is also the Indigenous student representative on the Students’ Union council at his university, as well as a member of the Community Futures Treaty Seven Student Advisory committee, and the National Student Director for the Council for the Advancement of Native Development Officers. Crow is very passionate about giving back to his community through the various advocacy and volunteer positions that he holds and is very excited and honored to participate in the 2022 Cando Economic Development Youth Summit.

Case Study Overview:

Jesse James

Norm Lavallee

Jesse

Jesse James is a member of Peguis First Nation and is the Special Projects Manager for Tulo Centre and the Regional Outreach Manager for the First Nations Tax Commission. Prior to joining FNTC, Jesse has worked for First Nation governments in British Columbia since 1996.

Over the past 25 years, Jesse became familiar working with all levels of government and other organizations such as ISC, CIR, Province of BC, First Nation Health Authority, CMHC and other First Nations. Jesse has gained broad experience including negotiations within BC Treaty Process, community ratification of Land Code under the First Nation Land Management Act and assisted implementing and maintaining a property tax system under the First Nations Fiscal Management Act. He also participated in the initial stages of a Nation-building plan to formalize the inter-tribal relationship of several individual First Nations.

Jesse graduated from Thompson Rivers University with a certificate in First Nations Tax Administration and has also received a certificate in Ch’nook Aboriginal Management Program from the University of British Columbia.

 

Norm

Norm Lavallee is an Economist with Fiscal Realities Economists and has also worked with the Tulo Centre of Indigenous Economics since its inception. Norm has 15 years of experience in data and statistical analysis, systems analysis, strategy development, research and technical writing, curriculum development and instruction related to First Nations public policy, economics & development, jurisdiction, and taxation. Norm has written and contributed to several publications on First Nations market history, fiscal relationships, and economic development. Norm has an MBA with an Economics and Finance focus from Thompson Rivers University. 

 

 

 

What is Economic Development? What is CED?  Why is it important?

Speakers:

Shawna Morning-Bull, Cando’s Alberta Board of Director

John Hazenberg, Cando's NWT Board of Director

ShawnaShawna Morning-Bull is a member of the Piikani First Nation located in Southern Alberta. Shawna is presently employed as the Manager Business Development at Community Futures Treaty Seven (CFT7) in Calgary, Alberta. In this capacity she is responsible for the overall direction, evaluation, and operations of the various development initiatives which the Community Futures Treaty Seven is currently involved in or wishes to pursue. Shawna has been employed by Community Futures Treaty Seven for the past 9 years. Prior, she was a Business Loans Manag-er with Alberta Indian Investment Corporation and a Business Support Officer with Indian Business Corporation, but her career in business began with Peace Hills Trust in 1997. She is a graduate of Lethbridge College with Busi-ness Management and Criminal Justice. Presently, she is the Secretary for Piikani Resource Development Limited Board of Directors, an entity operating on the Piikani Nation to develop, design and implement projects, pro-grams and services for the benefit of her First Nation economy. In 2015, Shawna joined the Calgary Chamber of Commerce Indigenous Opportunities Sub-Committee. Shawna, also is on the Board of Directors on her second term with CANDO as the Alberta Representative and is the 2018 recipient of the Chief David Crowchild Award, she was presented this award by Mayor Nenshi in June 2018 for her efforts to build bridges in and around Calgary between indigenous and non-indigenous people and entities.

Shawna is married to Wade and together they have 5 children and 2 grandchildren. She enjoys attending her chil-dren’s activities such as college basketball, hockey, mixed martial arts, wrestling and they all enjoy hitting the powwow trail, where Shawna is a traditional dancer.

 

John HazenbergJohn Hazenberg

It has been my privilege to have served on a number of boards including CANDO. I am pleased to offer my services again because I strongly believe in all of the services provided by CANDO and feel I have the ability to help guide the organization.

I feel I can effectively represent the Northwest Territories. I have visited every community in the NWT and have developed relationships with people in all of our regions.

I have worked in economic Development serving communities out of Fort Simpson and also worked in the Tlicho communi-ties as well as Yellowknife. As General Manager of the GNWT Petroleum Products Division, I managed local fuel delivery contracts in many isolated communities. In addition, I served as chairman of two Business Development Corporations and presently sit on the board of the Akaitcho Business Development Corporation.

The NWT is very unique with limited economic development services and opportunities. CANDO is a great support for EDO’s living in isolated communities as well as the major centres.

I have lived and worked in several communities and feel that in this period of Covid-19, economic development is more important than ever. It is my goal to bring the CANDO spirit to the North.
I am very proud of how, through CANDO, economic development officers can avail themselves to the benefits such as Links to Learning, annual conferences, sharing of best practices, the CEDI initiatives to bring local indigenous and municipal gov-ernments together and the opportunities for professional development through the EDO certificate process.

 

Building a Sustainable and Resilient Indigenous Economy Game

Speakers:

Jesse James

Norm Lavallee

 

Jesse

Jesse James is a member of Peguis First Nation and is the Special Projects Manager for Tulo Centre and the Regional Outreach Manager for the First Nations Tax Commission. Prior to joining FNTC, Jesse has worked for First Nation governments in British Columbia since 1996.

Over the past 25 years, Jesse became familiar working with all levels of government and other organizations such as ISC, CIR, Province of BC, First Nation Health Authority, CMHC and other First Nations. Jesse has gained broad experience including negotiations within BC Treaty Process, community ratification of Land Code under the First Nation Land Management Act and assisted implementing and maintaining a property tax system under the First Nations Fiscal Management Act. He also participated in the initial stages of a Nation-building plan to formalize the inter-tribal relationship of several individual First Nations.

Jesse graduated from Thompson Rivers University with a certificate in First Nations Tax Administration and has also received a certificate in Ch’nook Aboriginal Management Program from the University of British Columbia.

 

Norm

Norm Lavallee is an Economist with Fiscal Realities Economists and has also worked with the Tulo Centre of Indigenous Economics since its inception. Norm has 15 years of experience in data and statistical analysis, systems analysis, strategy development, research and technical writing, curriculum development and instruction related to First Nations public policy, economics & development, jurisdiction, and taxation. Norm has written and contributed to several publications on First Nations market history, fiscal relationships, and economic development. Norm has an MBA with an Economics and Finance focus from Thompson Rivers University. 

 

 

– Day 2 -

Economic Development Panel

Panelists:

Katrina Shade, Manager of Piikani Resource Development Ltd.

Bryce Starlight, VP Development with Canderel MDC Development Management Inc.

Katrina

Katrina Shade is a member of the Piikani Nation in southern Alberta a member of the Blackfoot Confederacy. Katrina is the Manager of Piikani Resource Development Ltd. (PRDL) in Brocket, AB.  PRDL is the Economic Development corporation for the Piikani Nation.  Developing Resources on and off the Nation.  Katrina has a Bachelor of Management and has been employed with Piikani Resource Development Ltd. since 2014. 

The Piikani Nation is rich in its wind, sun and water resource.  PRDL and Katrina harness this opportunity by aiding in the development and management of renewable energy projects both on and off the Nation. Including owning Transmission Assets on the Piikani Nation becoming the first, First Nation in Alberta to become a Transmission Facility Owner ( TFO). PRDL has also developed a commercial sand and gravel pit, industrial security services, and a communications entity including an app, radio station and newspaper.   In Katrina’s free time she likes to watch her son play hockey, spend time with family and travel.

Bryce StarlightBryce Starlight represents the Tsuut’ina Nation as VP Development with Canderel MDC Development Management Inc., the entity responsible for the planning and development of Tsuut’ina Developments, a comprehensive 1,200 acre development project in partnership with Canderel that is located adjacent to the southwest border of the City of Calgary.  This comprehensive development encompasses three major precincts that will be developed over the next 20 years providing for a wide range of retail, office, entertainment, hospitality and institutional uses.  Mr. Starlight has an active role in managing the planning and development activities at Taza including the Shops at Buffalo Run and the Costco development and is currently leading development at Taza Crossing which includes innovative concepts such as a Living Lab and an innovation accelerator business park.  He is directly involved in coordinating Legislative, Land Code and Property Tax development, as well as advising on the Nation’s strategic Public Works expansion and growth.  Mr. Starlight has an extensive background working with many Aboriginal communities, and has been widely involved in both political and technical working groups relating to First Nations land management, water policy, and resource management.  Bryce previously spent over 5 years in the private sector, working closely with Aboriginal communities to develop their pipeline and transmission line applications throughout Alberta and BC.  Bryce earned a BA (Political Science) degree from the University of Calgary as well as a Diploma from Mount Royal University.

 

Lands Presentation

Speakers:

Shaun Peters

Ralph J. Roulette Jr.

ShaunShaun Peters is a member of Long Plain First Nation, a signatory of Treaty 1. Certified Land Manager with a geomatics background. Currently working for Manitoba USKE, building capacity in Land Management for all First Nations in Manitoba.

RalphRalph J. Roulette Jr. is a member of Long Plain First Nation, a signatory of Treaty 1. Working in LPFN, Ralph is a certified Land Manager who has interests in Geomatics and History. Currently working for Manitoba USKE, he is working with First Nations to map their land base using remote sensing technologies such as drones and satellite imagery.


Cando TAED/NIEEF Presentation

Speakers:

Carmelle Nepoose

Carmelle Nepoose

Carmelle Nepoose is from Samson Cree Nation of Maskwacis, Alberta.

Carmelle has Business Administration Accounting Diploma from Northern Alberta Institute of Technology. She was previously employed with Samson Cree Nation for the last four years, where she was a dedicated employee in the Residential Development department as a CMHC Coordinator. She is very passionate about helping her Nation and Nation members by providing the best resources for programs available.

For the last 3 years, Carmelle was the Special Projects Coordinator, where she oversaw the regional events before she transferred into the role of Certification Coordinator (West).

Carmelle looks forward to having the opportunity to work with many accomplished Indigenous Economic Development Officers and Land Managers from across Canada. Working in this position she has gained valuable work experience and enjoys networking with professionals in the field of Economic Development.

Additions to Reserves

Tim Daniels

Tim DanielsTim Daniels is a proud Anishinabe from the Long Plain First Nation, located on Treaty 1 Territory. He is currently Chief Development Officer with Treaty 1 Development Corporation responsible for planning and the re-development of the 160 acre former Kapyong Barracks in Winnipeg, now known as Naawi-Oodena.

Tim has a wealth of experience in property and business development and is devoted to projects that help First Nations strive for economic success and sustainability.
His accomplishments include development of Long Plain Urban Reserves in both Winnipeg and Portage la Prairie which have established LPFN as an economic force in
Canada.

Tim has won many awards including as Economic Developer of the Year, the Spirit of Growth and Visionary Indigenous Business Excellence awards to mention just a few.

Cultural Breakout rooms:

Youth will have an opportunity to chose a workshop provided below:

 

Finger Weaving:

Kalyn KodiakThis cultural experience includes teachings on history of the Métis sash, and participants will get to experience the finger weaving technique.


Instructor:

Kalyn Kodiak

Kalyn Kodiak is a proud Métis and two-spirited person who is descended from a long lineage of healers, teachers and artists. She found her passion in her early 20’s when she took a class on plant identification at the Wild Rose College of Natural Healing. She is now a teacher who share her knowledge of plants, herbs and wellness. She loves to see the comprehension in someone’s eye when they start to understand a new concept.

Kalyn hosts workshops, educational sessions and teaches school groups. She works hard to provide an open and welcoming learning space for all peoples. Some of her work is specific to the Métis community, while her other work is designed for anyone who is interested in learning about plants, the land, and cultural practices.

She is a resource on traditional medicines to the Métis communities of southern Alberta, and aen aapikayahk sayncheur flayshii (Métis sash weaver). She is also a founding member and the current president of the Alberta Herbalists Association.

 

Hand Games:

Ellison StarlightThe game is played by two opposing teams. There are two pairs of "bones", one pair with a stripe and one without. The game also uses a set of scoring sticks (usually ten) and in some areas a "kick" or "king" stick—an extra stick won by the team who gets to start the game.

 

Instructor:

Ellison Starlight

 
Sizi Ellison Starlight at’a, Goji-tii uwa Tsuut’ina istłini at’a (My name is Ellison Starlight, I am from the Kainai/Bloods and Tsuut’ina Nations). I am a Tsuut’ina Gunaha (language) teacher, I have been working with the Tsuut’ina Gunaha Nasʔagha for twelve years, teaching the Tsuut’ina language, learning alongside the fluent speakers and parts of the culture. I grew up in the Tsuut’ina nation, learning how to bead and sew from my mother and grandmothers.

What I learn from the elders I try to teach within the classes to pass the teaching down to the future generations such as beading, sewing, and picking traditional herbs and berries. Teaching a few traditional games double ball, hand games, mini tipi raising scream and yell game. During the months of May and June while the weather is nice the students reward we play the traditional games and at the beginning of the school year, we pick sage to use within our school to smudge to have good thoughts and good vibes for the day.

 

 

Beadwork using Home Tanned Hide (Beginner Level):

 

Jessica Sanderson-BarryNo prior beadwork experience required.  This will give each opportunity to edge a pair of earrings and work with home tanned hide.  They will be  able to take the pair of earrings home after the workshop and my hope is they continue with their beading journey. 

 

Instructor:

Jessica Sanderson-Barry

 

 

 

 

 

 



– Day 3 -

 

Optional Wellness Session:

Facilitator:

Michelle Nieviadomy

Michelle Nieviadomy is Nehiyaw Iskwew (Cree woman) with a passion for wellness, social justice & community development.  

She is a member of Kawacatoose First Nation and while her roots are in Saskatchewan, she has called Edmonton home for the past 20 years.

She is the Assistant Director at the Edmonton Native Healing Centre. 

She is an entrepreneur with her own business called Iskwew Health promoting health & wellness in various capacities! (Zumba, meditation, bootcamp, fitness kickboxing, wellness retreats)  She believes movement is medicine & connection is everything!  

Entrepreneurship Panel

Speakers:

Bobby Racette

Payne Many Guns

Bobbie RacetteBobbie Racette is the Founder and CEO of Virtual Gurus, a talent marketplace that leverages proprietary technology to match organizations and entrepreneurs with highly skilled Canadian and American fractional administrative workers. Forbes recently announced Virtual Gurus as one of the top 19 Innovative Tech Startups to watch.

Bobbie is on a mission to create employment opportunities for underrepresented individuals, setting a mandate within her own company that 95% of her workers will identify as female, 65% a part of the BIPOC community, and 45% part of the LGBTQ+ community.

An unstoppable force in the Canadian startup community, Bobbie acts as a mentor for eCommerce North and serves on the Board of the Telus Friendly Future Foundation, helping to build brighter futures for at-risk youth through the power of technology. She’s also a member of The51’s Community Council and Calgary’s CORE Working Group, ensuring the voices of underrepresented folx are included at both local and national levels.

Named as one of 50 Changemakers for 2021 by Report on Business magazine, Bobbie was also recently honoured by Startup Canada as Indigenous Entrepreneur and Woman Entrepreneur of the Year. Bobbie is a Cree-Metis woman who prides herself on building an inclusivity-first company, championing indigenous people and the LGBTQ+ community.

 

PaynePayne Many Guns is a member of the Siksika Nation, a member of the Blackfoot Confederacy and signed with Treaty 7. Payne is currently a student at the Lethbridge College studying Business Administration majoring in Management. Payne is also the owner of Niitsitapi Company, a clothing brand that he started at the age of 16 in 2018. Niitsitapi Company supports Blackfoot Language revitalization through inspiring and implementing solutions through business. The idea of creating a business to support Blackfoot Language revitalization developed from Payne’s understanding of the Blackfoot language, culture and history. Payne is currently working to grow his business while continuing his post secondary education. 

  

First Nation – Municipal Community Economic Development Initiative (CEDI)

Speakers:

Marissa Lawrence, CEDI Senior Program Officer, Cando

Marissa Lawrence

Marissa Lawrence has worked for Cando as the Senior Program Officer for the First Nation – Municipal Community Economic Development Initiative (CEDI) since July 2017. As a member of the CEDI team, Marissa supports First Nation – municipal partnerships across the country to establish respectful and equitable partnerships and to build capacity to engage in joint planning for community economic development and land-use.

Marissa has a rich background of designing and convening community-bridging intercultural dialogue and engagement programming. Marissa holds a BA in Communications, Minor in Dialogue from Simon Fraser University (SFU), Dialogue and Civic Engagement Certificate from SFU, and is a Cando-certified Technician Aboriginal Economic Developer (TAED). She is currently working to attain the Professional Indigenous Lands Management Certificate through Vancouver Island University.

 

 

Cultural Experience

 

Buffalo PaddocksYouth will be have an opportunity to participate in touring the traditional and sustainable Buffalo Paddock and its impact on the Tsuuti’na Nation. The tour guides are knowledgeable locals will lead a walk-through of the Buffalo Paddock.

Youth will be provided free hotel pick-up and drop-off, bagged lunch with bottled water, and along with sweetgrass that the youth will had picked on site.

On the way back to the hotel, the youth will be given a tour of Tsuuti’ina’s 5 billion dollar TAZA Project Development.

 

Clayton Whitney
Ts ūt' n  Buffalo Paddock (Xān -tīī Mōn stsīyk’ )
Agricultural Lands (N sk’ā N gūst’īn-n ) Manager
Sizi (My name is), Clayton Whitney, at’a, from the Tsuut’ina Nation Reserve. I started working with the Buffalo Paddock in 2015. The diversity of the position and all the different aspects of working, studying and caring for the buffalo and interacting with individuals in the buffalo business has been a great learning experience. I believe in the importance of the Xanit’i (Buffalo) for the Tsuut’ina Nation, and have worked hard to maintain and care for the heard.

When I started, the heard had 86 head, with great determination and patience the heard have grown to approximately 278 head. This year in 2022 there will be a possibility of about 160 calves born.

Our main crew consists of myself, Trenton Heavenfire and Brennen Starlight. We all have our own workplans on a daily basis, whether it is feeding the buffalo, helping load bales for Nation members, getting supplies for the buffalo paddock or fencing and helping the farmers with their field work that they do for the Nation.

Our main job and focus is to maintain and care for the well-being and health of each buffalo. Raising them as wild animals, within their respective native environment.

Every November the Tsuut’ina Buffalo Paddock prepares and sets up a round-up for all the heard to come in from their pastures for their annual checkups, shots and is where we organize the heard by separating the calves, bulls and the rest of the heard.

 


For more information, please contact:

Danielle Lightning
Email: danielle.lightning@edo.ca
Toll free: 1-800-463-9300  ext 229
Phone Number: 780-990-0303 ext 229

Fax Number: 780-429-7487