Carcross Tagish Management Corporation

Tourists flocking to Yukon-based Carcross Commons

Carcross

Following a recent expansion, the Carcross Commons, which is becoming a popular tourist attraction, now features 21 units.

By Sam Laskaris
Cando Writer

Members of the Carcross/Tagish Management Corporation have not been resting on their laurels. Officials with the corporation, the economic arm of the Yukon-based Carcross/Tagish First Nation, continue to seek ways to improve their recent successes while exploring other opportunities as well.

One of the economic development initiatives in the community is the Carcross Commons, a retail village featuring various shops and restaurants. Following a recent expansion, the Commons, which began with eight units now features 21 units.

There’s also a waiting list of others looking to become part of the venue.

“We’re looking to potentially expand on that site,” said Nelson Lepine, the President and CEO of the Carcross/Tagish Management Corporation. “But we need approval from our territorial government. We can’t grow any more unless they evolve with us. We want to manage the growth. And we want to bring as many citizens as we can here. We’re trying to be as diverse as we can be.”

Besides earning praise for its various ventures, the Carcross/Tagish First Nation is also one of the five nominees this year for Cando’s community of the year award.

Winners in this category, as well as for the individual economic development officer and Aboriginal Private Sector Business award, will be honoured at the Cando Conference, which will be held in late October in Fredericton, NB. 

Besides the fact the Carcross Commons is becoming an increasingly popular tourist attraction, another reason why travellers are venturing to the First Nation is because of its breathtaking trails built on Montana Mountain.

The mountain lies on Carcross/Tagish First Nation territory. About 40 kilometres of trails have been built or restored on the First Nation to be enjoyed by hikers, mountain bikers, skiers or snowshoers.

“We do market that quite heavily,” Lepine said. “I’ve had calls from as far away as Europe. And I get a lot of calls from people in B.C. because we’re fairly close.”